New Hampshire Public Colleges Seek Ways To Increase Enrollment


During the uncertainty of the pandemic, a large number of students opted for a gap year. This sent a wave of ripples through higher education institutions, and colleges have now devised new methods to bounce back from an unusual year. Including all of its institutions, the New Hampshire university system has said the pandemic has left it with a $ 25 million deficit. A healthy savings account has filled the gap, but public colleges are bracing for long-term complications. Enrollment in two- and four-year colleges across the country has been lower than in previous years. Granite State College told News 9 that its summer enrollments are down, but said it was receiving larger inquiries for the fall semester than a year ago. One obstacle facing colleges in New Hampshire is a 1.5% drop in the number of high school graduates each year. “There are fewer high school students and graduates than ten years ago,” said university system spokeswoman Catherine Provencher. “The demographics tell us they will continue to decline in New England. Early projections show the University of New Hampshire is going against the trend. Administration officials said they had increased the UNH’s offer of financial aid. “We have bounced back from the COVID situation with enrollments up 5% from last year at the undergraduate level and 15% over the past year at the graduate level,” Marshal Wayne Jones mentioned. To combat these problems, the university system has implemented a restructuring program to cut spending by 10%. To achieve this goal, the system offered early retirement and consolidated some staff. Officials said they plan to release COVID-19 protocols in late July. >> MORE FROM WMUR: Preliminary FAA report says plane struck power line over Charlestown field

During the uncertainty of the pandemic, a large number of students opted for a gap year. This sent a wave of ripple through higher education institutions, and colleges have now devised new methods of bouncing back from an unusual year.

Including all of its institutions, the New Hampshire university system has said the pandemic has left it with a $ 25 million deficit. A healthy savings account has filled the gap, but public colleges are bracing for long-term complications.

Enrollment in two- and four-year colleges across the country has been lower than in previous years. Granite State College told News 9 that its summer enrollments were down, but said it was receiving more solid inquiries for the fall semester than a year ago.

One obstacle facing colleges in New Hampshire is a 1.5% drop in the number of high school graduates each year.

“There are fewer high school students and graduates than ten years ago,” said university system spokeswoman Catherine Provencher. “The demographics tell us they will continue to decline in New England.”

Early projections show the University of New Hampshire is going against the trend. Administration officials said they had increased the UNH’s financial aid offer.

“We have recovered from the COVID situation with enrollments up 5% from last year at the undergraduate level and 15% over the past year at the graduate level,” said the Marshal Wayne Jones.

To combat these problems, the university system has implemented a restructuring program to cut spending by 10%. To achieve this objective, the system offered early retirement and consolidated part of the staff.

Officials said they plan to release the COVID-19 protocols at the end of July.

>> MORE FROM WMUR: Preliminary FAA report says plane struck power line over Charlestown field


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